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Offline Wyn

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Chains
« on: October 20, 2020, 07:19:52 PM »
Okay, what's the difference between chain lube and wax. I'm new to chains. Any plus's or minuses? Thanks in advance.

Online Matty589

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Re: Chains
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2020, 08:56:49 PM »
Wax is meant to stick to the chain so less fling, but wax  can attract dirt. The best lubricant Iíve found in terms of application is SDOC100 white chain spray - be sparing, let it dry, ideally overnight and it seems to keep the chain nice and shiny. Whether itís better than basic gear oil for lubrication or chain life is anyoneís guess!

Offline Wyn

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Re: Chains
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2020, 11:35:34 AM »
Thanks, Matty, I'm currently using Maxima Chain Wax, and yesterday I received a can of Motorex Chain Clean. I cleaned and waxed my chain. Now waiting for some free time to ride.
Good reviews on the UTube on the SDOC S100 White Chain Spray. Lots of opinions out there on what to use. I'll bet it's all good.
I know there will come a time when I'll have to remove the front sprocket cover and clean out in there. I think I counted 6/8 bolts that need to be removed and then put back and torqued.
Seems a bit much, but it is what it is. Perhaps I'll leave that for the techs. when I get it serviced.

Offline Newguy

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Re: Chains
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2020, 01:44:51 PM »
*Originally Posted by Wyn [+]
Okay, what's the difference between chain lube and wax. I'm new to chains. Any plus's or minuses? Thanks in advance.

That is one way to open up the bottomless pit of topics.
OK so there's waxes and lubes, the often mentioned WD-40 will come up in every damn conversation about it so i'm mentioning, it now.
Simple advice about it, Don't use it..It's not meant for that. Graphite based lubricants; The same can be said for that where chains are concerned, just because they sell it doesn't mean it is the right one for the job. I used to have a very detailed write-up about the subject in another bike owner forum but it's gone now.

I've been using PJ1 Blue for all weather riding for most of the time i've been on MC's. It works well and doesn't fling much if at all, it has successfully prevented rust from forming on the chain ( i rode the 850 during the winter on treated roads).

FortNine did an interesting chain lube round-up although it doesn't really encompass much of whats out there it was thorough with what they had available.

I've not used chain wax on anything except bicycles, they work OK but I wouldn't trust something that undergoes the level of stress and friction that a MC chain does. The consensus i've seen regarding wax, is similar to the other two alternative lubes mentioned above where motorcycles are concerned.

Most lubes will fling, some go on clear but after a while they will turn dark-ish.

There is one or two dry-lube types i've tried that go on clear and leave it looking spotless, its the perfect thing for a show bike that never goes in the dirt. The coating doesn't last very long but works great for that purpose.
I took a motorcycle to a mechanic to have it worked on when I was testing the dry lube, I had lubed it prior to the trip over. The mechanic took one look at the chain, touched it then put chain oil on it. :D It's invisible stuff!


Lastly chain cleaning products; In the US A brand called Honda Chain Cleaner is something I swear by it for a few reasons.
One it works, really well! ; Second the price and quantity I can buy it in is better than the competition. I paid about 40 bucks for what amounts to 1.5 years worth of chain cleaner, I log a lot of chain time.
I've had the opportunity to try a whole host of other alternatives, i always came back to this one.

Offline Tioli

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Re: Chains
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2020, 07:23:04 AM »
This is typical of how a scottoiler oiled chain can look. I just came back from a 300km ride and by the looks of that I could turn it down a little. The rollers are oiled the sprocket teeth are oiled between the links is more oiled on the right side as that's the side of the sprocket the dripper runs and the outside gets nothing hence the rust.

Hindsight is a terrible way to learn Iíd rather be gifted

Offline Newguy

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Re: Chains
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2020, 08:23:34 AM »
*Originally Posted by Tioli [+]
This is typical of how a scottoiler oiled chain can look. I just came back from a 300km ride and by the looks of that I could turn it down a little. The rollers are oiled the sprocket teeth are oiled between the links is more oiled on the right side as that's the side of the sprocket the dripper runs and the outside gets nothing hence the rust.


I bought a scott oiler but never put it on, i've been happy enough with the exsiting regime but if I were to tour with a chain drive the scott oiler would be essential.
As long as I stay out of the dirt my chains look cleaner after 400 miles than this.

Offline Tioli

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Re: Chains
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2020, 08:35:30 AM »
Thatís probably because i never clean it just look at it and adjust the dial from road light drip to dirt cleanse. It gets a hose off as part of washing the bike but thatís it so some build Is expected I guess. Good fix if you are not into maintaining a chain and it seems to make them last a long time. For me itís the best option after shaft or belt drive.
Hindsight is a terrible way to learn Iíd rather be gifted

Offline Wyn

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Re: Chains
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2020, 12:16:24 PM »
I'd have to concur with Newguy. Good peace of mind on a road trip. For my riding relm, I'll stick with manual. Whatever blows your hair back. :305:
« Last Edit: October 22, 2020, 12:17:24 PM by Wyn »

Offline Wyn

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Re: Chains
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2020, 12:19:36 PM »
Tioli, how about a pic of where you mounted it.

Offline Tioli

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Re: Chains
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2020, 12:31:32 PM »
The way I mounted it is hear

https://www.850gs.com/index.php/topic,596.msg3763.html#msg3763

You can also get mounting instructions from the Scottoiler website

I can do a few extra photos of the exact way I mounted the end dripper as the instructions did confuse me a little to get every little detail round the right way like they wanted it.
Hindsight is a terrible way to learn Iíd rather be gifted